Praxis Core Review Sessions Fall 2017

The UMF Learning Commons hosts multiple Praxis Core review sessions for students who would like some extra assistance preparing for the test. These sessions will be held as followed:

Writing- Multiple Choice Monday, September 18th 7-8 PM Ed Center 107
Math- Functions & Algebra Wednesday, September 20th 7-8PM Ed Center 106
Writing- Informative Essay Monday, September 25th 7-8 PM Ed Center 107
Math- Geometry Wednesday, September 27th 7-8 PM Ed Center 106
Writing- Argumentative Essay Monday, October 2nd 7-8 PM Ed Center 107
Math- Stats & Probability Wednesday, October 4th 7-8 PM Ed Center 106

Students are also welcome to visit the Learning Commons during tutoring hours (M-Th 12-2, Su-Th 7-9) for individual help.

An excellent online resource is the Learning Express Library. Once you create a free account, you can search for ‘PRAXIS Core’ to call up  4 different practice PRAXIS tests in Writing and Math.

Live and Work in Maine

Maine is facing a demographic dilemma- the population is growing older, and workers are retiring at rates higher than new employees are entering the field. Maine needs to develop a strong workforce to help ensure that employers can continue to thrive. Live and Work in Maine is an initiative to recruit hard working individuals from across the country and the world to live in the beautiful state of Maine.

With Live and Work in Maine, you can search for places to live or places to work, and the other will follow. If you care more about living in the mountains than anything else, they can help you find the perfect location and then a job to follow. If you are willing to live on the beach, in the woods, or in the city- wherever it takes to get you your dream job- then Live and Work in Maine can help you find that job and then a place to live from there. “Our mission is to show the world that in Maine, you can have it all when it comes to quality of life AND quality of career.”

So, how do you go about finding the perfect place to live? You can search for a location based on three different categories:

Region– the various regions of Maine that are listed include: Aroostook County, Downeast & Acadia, Maine Lakes & Mountains, Kennebec Valley, Maine Highlands, Midcoast, Greater Portland & Casco Bay, and Maine Beaches

Lifestyle– if there are certain hobbies, sceneries, structures, or population density that you prefer, you can filter for them! Various lifestyle choices listed include (but are not limited to): lakes & ponds, bricks and cobblestone, “trees, trees, & more trees”, camping, fishing, golf, hunting, ski/snow sports, historic, live music, shopping, theatre/arts, always active, peace & quiet, etc. It is easy to find something for everyone!

Career– You can also search for regions/areas that have available jobs that meet specific filters, such as job industry, region, employer size, internships, seasonal jobs, and entry level jobs.

 

 

How do you go about finding your dream job in Maine? Jobs and internships can also be searched for and explored in a couple of ways:

Job Board–  on the Job Board page you can search for jobs by keyword, job title or specific location. Jobs can be filtered by type, geographic region, and industry. The Job Board also lists job postings with job title, employer name and location, description of job, and links to apply, view the employer profile, and save the job posting. See a job that your friend would be perfect for? There is also an option to share the job info with a friend! What better way to find your dream job and move to Vacationland than to do it with a friend?

Explore Employers– The Explore Employers page allows for you to search for employers based on employer name, career, and lifestyle. Each employer profile includes brief description, location information, and contact info to get in touch with the employer.

 

Live and Work in Maine strives to help individuals relocate to an area they will love, and work in a position that will allow them to thrive. The Live and Work in Maine Instagram page (@liveworkmaine) includes an abundance of pictures exhibiting the various lifestyles and hobbies that can be lived in Maine.

Foodies, hikers, adventurers, writers, artists, entrepreneurs, and everyone else is sure to find somewhere and something they love in Maine. Find what you love, and find it in Maine.

  

Tips for Staying Organized This Semester

Syllabus week: the week where you get to see just how challenging and time consuming each class will be, as well as the expectations placed upon you this semester. It is easy to fall behind and get overwhelmed, especially within the few weeks of the semester. To make sure you keep up with the readings, hand in assignments on time, and have a happy and successful semester, follow these tips to stay organized!:

1.Get a planner… and use it!

Often times, students will pick out the best planner they can find, get so excited about using it, and end up forgetting about it after the second week. Get into the habit of writing EVERYTHING in it-assignments, meetings, work schedule, assigned readings, plans with friends, etc. If you get into the habit of using your planner every day, you will be more likely to use it all the time.

 

 

2. Highlight your syllabus

Sometimes, syllabi can be overwhelming to look it. Every professor sets theirs up differently, and it can be hard to find and differentiate actual assignment due dates from quizzes and readings. If you assign a different color to different kinds of assignments (readings, tests/quizzes, assignments to hand in, etc.) then you can quickly glance at your syllabus and see if there is anything coming up without having to stare at an overwhelming syllabus for too long.

 

3. Schedule homework/study time

Where as you are already following a class schedule, adding a few blocks of time across the week dedicated to studying and homework can help ensure that you get your assignments done. The schedule can be catered to your needs- if you prefer to work for a long period of time, then setting aside a few hours every couple of days to bang out all of your homework will work; if you can’t focus on one thing for very long, giving yourself an hour in the morning and an hour or two in the afternoon every day might be best. Or, maybe you prefer to save it all for Sunday. You should make a homework schedule that caters to your needs and will help you be most successful.

 

4. Make a morning routine that you enjoy, and do it every day

It can be very hard to feel motivated in the morning, especially when you have early classes. If you create a morning routine that you enjoy, you will be more motivated to get out of bed. Love having a nice hot cup of coffee in the morning? Set the coffee maker up the night before so that all you have to do is turn it on and start it, and there’s your coffee! Do you enjoy getting your body moving in the morning? Wake up an extra half hour early to go for a light jog or a walk, or do some yoga right in your room! Create a morning playlist that you listen to as you get ready to pump you up in the morning. Find what it is that you enjoy doing in the morning and incorporate it into your routine in order to motivate yourself each morning!

 

5. Plan the night before

Picking out your outfit and packing your backpack can take up an extra 10-15 minutes in the morning. Pick and set your outfit out the night before, and pack your backpack the night before. It will save you time before you leave, and you can also make sure you have everything you need. You don’t want to forget a few things or bring the wrong book with you if you pack your bag when you’re half awake in the morning.

 

6. Print things out ahead of time, every time

As great as technology is, it can fail as well. There is nothing worse than not being able to print your paper ten minutes before class starts. And chances are, most professors will not consider technology failure as an excuse for late assignments. Print assignments out the day before they are due, or even a few hours before they are due. If something goes wrong, there will be plenty of time to fix it or print in another location. Printing locations on campus include: Spenciner Curriculum Materials Center (located in the Education Center), the Learning Commons (Mantor Library first floor), Mantor Library 3rd floor, and the Technology Commons (open 24/7).

 

7. Make use of various study locations on campus

UMF is a beautiful campus, with many locations to work on homework and assignments. Some locations, that may be busy and noisy sometimes, include the lobby in the Kalikow Education Center, Beaver Lodge, The Landing, the Technology Center, and the lounge/common room in the dorms. Mantor Library has many options, including private study rooms (in the basement and on the second floor), the mezzanine, the Learning Commons (first floor), Mantor Cafe, and the third floor which is often the quietest. The Learning Commons, private study rooms, and Technology Center have spaces that are designed for group work as well. Explore the campus and try various spots until you find the one that works best for you.

 

 

8. Manage your time wisely when it comes to assignments

It is important to learn how to plan out your tasks in order of importance/time consumption. If you have a 10 page paper due on Thursday, do not start it on Tuesday. Start it at least a week in advance, if not sooner. This can give you an opportunity to do multiple drafts, take breaks from your writing, and give it 100% every time you work on it, as opposed to your effort dwindling down during the second half of the assignment. If you have a bigger assignment due on Friday than what is due on Thursday, you should start the big one first. Know what is a priority and what can wait, what needs more time and attention and what can be done within a few minutes. This will really help you stay organized and on top of assignments.

 

9. Schedule the non-academic tasks/chores that you are responsible for completing

After being in class and working all day, no one wants to do laundry, sweep, dust, vacuum, do dishes, etc. Create a simple, one task a day schedule. Assign yourself laundry on Monday, vacuuming on Tuesday, dusting on Wednesday, sweeping Thursday, and general picking up on Friday. If you give yourself one task a day, it will be easier to get it over with and ensure that your environment is taken care of. Living in a cluttered, messy space can make it hard to keep other areas of your life organized as well.

 

10. Make time for yourself

Self care is so important when you are a busy college student. Classes, assignments, sports, meetings, work- it can all add up quickly and burn you out. Make sure you take time each day and week to do something for yourself. It can be anything that you enjoy, as long as you are doing it because you want to, not because you have to. You can read, go for a walk, take a nap, hangout with friends and family, paint, go to the gym, shop, watch your favorite movie- it does not matter, as long as you set aside time where you are not working on or thinking about your other responsibilities.

 

Student Teaching Symposium #CountOnLearning

The final semester of college for most education majors is one of the most anticipated as they finally take on the role as a student teacher. Students are nervous, excited, anxious, and optimistic as they go into their student teaching position. Most students do not know what to expect during student teaching or how to prepare. Chelsey Oliver, UMF Class of 2017, felt the same way, as she would go to the symposium presentations every year looking for one about the student teaching experience. Year after year her searches came up short, so when it was her time to serve as a student teacher she decided to present at symposium about her experience.

Chelsey Oliver just graduated from the University of Maine at Farmington in the spring of 2017. During her final semester as a secondary education mathematics major, Chelsey completed her student teaching at Cony High School and Messalonskee Middle School. While education majors share their student teaching experience through portfolio presentations, Chelsey wanted to go beyond the units, lesson plans, and standards highlighted in portfolio presentations and also focus on the day-to-day experience of being a student teacher in a classroom. “A big part of my philosophy is collaborating with your colleagues, students, and teachers,” said Chelsey, “so this to me was the most exciting presentation I would give.”

Chelsey started her presentation by going over the daily schedule at both schools and comparing them. She touched upon some of the ‘out of the classroom’ components that came with student teaching, such as leaving the house in the morning when it is still dark out and getting home when it was dark out. Chelsey described some of the various programs and blocks in the school day, such as “RAM Time” at Cony High School, which was when teachers could meet one-on-one with students who may need help if they were absent, falling behind, or needed to finish a test. This was a great time for teachers to check-in with their students.

After going over the schedules, Chelsey emphasized the importance of self care and scheduling “me time.” As a teacher, you are constantly planning, grading, teaching, and working even when you are not at school. It is important to take care of yourself, and Chelsey did so by getting fresh air, meal prepping for the week ahead of time, and reflecting on her day.

Chelsey then gave a few classroom management tips, such as having a bin to leave work in for students who were absent. She also discussed making homework meaningful. She found that her students would do their homework, she would give feedback, and they would toss it in the trash. Chelsey then began assigning homework that required the students to talk about their struggles, their mistakes, a conversation they had with her that day, and to just personally reflect. This gave Chelsey a more personal look into her students’ lives as well. Chelsey then discussed technology and how it can be integrated into the classroom. Then, Chelsey touched upon her experience in UMF’s Student MEA (Maine Education Association) and how the various conferences, experiences, and collaborations that she participated in helped her develop as a professional.

 

Finally, Chelsey discussed the benefits of social media and how teachers can learn from each other. There are various Instagram pages, bloggers, and websites where teachers share their lessons, ideas, classroom management tips, and anything else you could imagine. Chelsey has also taken to social media and created a professional Twitter account (@countonlearning) and Instagram page (@countonlearning207) to share her teaching experience.

Chelsey’s student teaching experience was very meaningful to her, especially since she was able to personally share it at her symposium presentation. As the first student to present about their student teaching experience at symposium, she may have started a new trend as other UMF education majors will wish to share their experience as well. Congratulations to Chelsey and the rest of the UMF Class of 2017, and good luck as your begin your teaching career!

Recent Grads off to Paris!

Graduating from college is a very exciting time, but can also be stressful for many as they try to find a great job within their chosen field. However, two recent UMF graduates have found themselves with teaching positions at France universities! Hannah Somes and Hannah Carlson will be moving to France later this month to begin this new journey.

Both Hannah Somes and Hannah Carlson will be leading conversation-oriented English courses at the university level in order to help students become more fluent in English. They both learned about this opportunity through the French professors at UMF.

Hannah Somes will be living in Angers and will be residing in a dorm room in the campus residences. When asked what she is most looking forward to, Hannah said that she is hoping to gain an increased sense of confidence in herself as well as self-sufficiency. Hannah is also looking forward to being on the “other side” of the university experience as a faculty member this time. When asked what she is nervous about, she said “I am most nervous about leading my own class of university students who have a different first language from my own,” which is something that anyone would be nervous about! This is also the furthest from her family and friends she will have ever been, so that will be an adjustment as well.

Hannah Carlson will be living in an apartment in Les Mans, a city that is just about an hour train ride from Paris! Hannah is looking forward to becoming more proficient in French and to teaching English to the students in Les Mans. Hannah studied abroad for the spring 2016 semester in Les Mans (pictured right), so she is already familiar with the area. Hannah said she is also looking forward to traveling and seeing more of France and Europe.

What an amazing opportunity for these UMF alumna! We are very excited for the both of them and cannot wait to hear more about their adventures. Be sure to stay up to date with the ED360 blog to learn about more opportunities like this, as well as to hear from the Hannah’s again and learn about how their experience is going! From all of us at the University of Maine at Farmington, good luck and safe travels to the Hannah’s!

Meet the Editor: Brittany Jerome

Staff retirements, students teaching abroad, tips for applying to grad school- have you ever wondered who writes the blog posts for ED360? Brittany Jerome, an upcoming senior at the University of Maine at Farmington, has been our “chief journalist” these past few months!

Brittany is from Plymouth, Massachusetts where she was born and raised. She is an early childhood special education major with a minor in rehabilitation services in the Addiction Certification program. After she graduates from UMF in 2018, Brittany plans on moving back home to Massachusetts and going to grad school to get her Master’s degree in Applied Behavioral Analysis. “I want to work with young children with severe behavior problems,” said Brittany. “After my first practicum experience, I realized how important it is for children to receive intervention for behavior-related issues early on, in order to prevent suspension or even expulsion before they reach first grade. They usually just need assistance communicating their needs, they shouldn’t be labeled as a ‘bad kid.'”

Along with being our ED360 editor, Brittany also works as a Behavioral Health Professional (BHP) for Maine Behavioral Health Organization. As a BHP, Brittany provides one-on-one support to teens and adolescents with developmental delays and mental health diagnoses. “It’s a very rewarding job, and it has taught me a lot about patience, empathy, and working with families,” she said. The job definitely keeps her busy!

While on campus, Brittany tries to be as involved as she can! She is a member of Alpha Phi Omega, a co-ed fraternity that focuses on community service and organizes and participates in various service projects on campus and in the community. Brittany has served as treasurer, Membership Vice President, and President of APO during her past three years in the club, and she is looking forward to taking a break from e-board for the next year and just being an active member. Brittany and her friends also participate in some of the Mainely Outdoors day trips, including snowshoeing and cross country skiing.

Brittany has also participated in various trips offered at UMF. In 2016, Brittany traveled to New Orleans, Louisiana with the Intervarsity Club during spring break to aid in Hurricane relief and volunteer fixing up damaged houses. Brittany also recently returned from the travel course to Peru, where she spent two and a half weeks studying anthropology all over the country with peers. Brittany loves traveling and exploring new places!

This summer, Brittany has been working, spending time outside, and exploring all that Farmington has to offer in the summertime. If you see her around town or on campus feel free to say hello! Be sure to stay up to date with the ED360 blog posts to learn more about UMF, our students and faculty, and the various opportunities offered in the Farmington community!

Graduate Studies in Education at UMF

The University of Maine at Farmington understands the importance of furthering and continuing education. That is why UMF offers various graduate degrees and certification programs beyond the first four years. UMF offers two Master of Science in Education programs and five certificates, including other additional programs. With all of these options, future educators have great opportunities to continue their professional development.

Master of Science in Education:

M.S.Ed. in Early Childhood Education- This program prepares educators to also be advocates, leaders, curriculum specialists, program administrators, and resources for young children and their families. The program emphasizes curriculum, child development, assessment, and the family and community dynamic. Through collaboration with community agencies, students are able to get a hands-on approach to building their skills. Students are mentored by faculty with extensive knowledge and abilities in the education field.

Approximately 30% of the program is delivered face-to-face, while the remaining 70% is conducted online. This 36-credit program is designed to be completed in 6 years and is comprised of both core and elective classes, which will be related to the early childhood field.

 

M.S.Ed. in Educational Leadership- This program contributes to the professional, intellectual, and personal growth of educators who wish to serve as exceptional leaders in their schools and communities. The program emphasizes school improvement and action research. Students in the program will complete an acton research project during the final two courses. This project focuses on classroom practice and/or school improvement. It includes planning, intervention, data collection, analysis, and the producing a professional report by presenting to faculty and peers.

This program is also 30% face-to-face and 70% online. The program is designed to be completed in two to three years. The Master of Science in Education program is approved as part of the New England Association of Schools and Colleges (NEASC) accreditation of the University of Maine at Farmington.

 

Certificate Programs:

Certification Programs are four-course programs comprised to graduate study courses to provide participants with a comprehensive, strong knowledge and skill base in a defined area of study.

Certificate of Administration- Designed for educators with two years experience teaching (required for admission), this program provides participants with the skills and knowledge to pursue opportunities in school administration.

Certificate in Applied Behavioral Analysis- This program prepares educators and professionals to work with challenging and difficult behaviors. Applied Behavioral Analysis is one of the best evidence-based practices for working with children on the Autism spectrum. If you are interested in this program enroll now- it will not be offered again until the Fall 2019!

Certificate in Gifted and Talented Education- This program prepares educators to work with exceptionally gifted and talented children. All courses are offered in a blended format, combining both face-to-face and online deliveries.

Certificate in Math Leadership- This program is designed for currently practicing educators to pursue opportunities in mathematics leadership. This program opens doors to various career options, including Math Coach, RTI Coordinator, Title 1: Math Teacher, and more!

Certificate in Proficiency Based Education- This program is designed for educators who wish to grow their content knowledge and increase their pedagogy. Participants will increase their skills in curriculum design, instruction, assessment, organization, and communication in order to best teach their students.

 

Other Programs:

Maine Mathematics Coaching Project (MMCP)- In July of 2015 UMF began piloting the Maine Mathematics Coaching Project. MMCP is designed to support PreK-8 teachers in transitioning to the role of mathematics coach in an elementary school setting. The three goals of the program are to (1) prepare Maine students to meet career and college mathematics demands, (2) provide teachers in the state of Maine with high quality mathematics professional development, and (3) increase interest, engagement, and self-efficacy in mathematics for students and teachers.

Special Education Alternative Route to Certification (SPARC)- This online program helps to address the need for qualified special educators in the state of Maine. This program is open to all current Special Education educators holding a baccalaureate degree, including in-service educators, those working in Birth to Age 5 intervention settings, Ed Techs, and others. Upon program completion, participants will receive their 282 certification in Special Education in the state of Maine.

With a growing demand for qualified, knowledgable, experienced, and competent educators, there are many opportunities for educators to further their education. UMF programs are flexible and designed to meet the demands of a constantly changing field. For more information about UMF graduate and certification programs, visit the UMF Graduate Studies website.

Ten Fun Summer Activities to do with the Kids

Summer is a great time for children to play, hangout with one another, and learn while having fun! It can be hard keeping children occupied and entertained all of the time, especially on these long summer days off. Here are some different activities, indoors and out, messy and neat, that can be done with one child or multiple children:

Go for a nature walk- Nature walks are a great way to get outside and get moving. It gives children an opportunity to explore, ask questions, discover, and learn. Nature walks can have a purpose or a goal, such as finding as many birds as possible, or it can simply be taking a relaxing, quiet stroll together. Nature walks can be as busy or relaxing as you want!

 

Paint with leaves– While on that nature walk, it might be a good idea to collect some sticks and various leaves, pine needles, etc. These items can be attached to the end of the stick with a rubber band and used as a paintbrush! Using a variety of materials will give children different textures and patterns and allow them to creatively express themselves while exploring new materials.

 

Water balloon fun– Water balloons are a fun way to cool off on those hot summer days, and there are plenty of games that can be played! Have you ever heard of water balloon baseball? It’s just as fun as it sounds! Other games can include catch, tag, or just a free for all water balloon fight! Whatever you do with the water balloons, children are sure to have a blast!

 

 

Tie-dye- Tie-dyeing gives children an opportunity to create something themselves. They can create various patterns and observe their creative process at work. You can tie-dye shirts, socks, sheets, towels, hats, shorts, anything really! For various tie-dye patterns, click here.

 

Homemade Play-Dough- Again, why spend the money on store bought Play-Dough when children can help make it at home? This recipe allows for you to chose your own colors and choose how sticky or dry the dough is. For a full recipe on how make Play-Dough using Kool-Aid, click here. You can find tons of variations using other ingredients online as well- have fun!

Ice cream in a bag- Why spend the money at an expensive ice cream shop when you can make your own ice cream right at home? This recipe requires a few simple ingredients such as milk, cream, ice, rock salt, sugar, and any other flavorings or toppings you want! Children can easily assist and participate in the ice cream making process, and it tastes so good! For a complete recipe, click here.

 

 

DIY bird feeders- Children will love watching birds and squirrels come up and eat off of the bird feeder that they helped to make. It is a fun and easy process that any child can participate in. These cookie cutter bird feeders can be hung anywhere and can be personalized to various shapes! For the full recipe, click here. DIY bird feeders also be made in various different ways, so click here for more examples and styles of bird feeders.

 

Messy Twister– Turn an old, family fun game into a messy work of art outside! Kids will love getting messy with this one, and the clean up can be just as fun if you use a hose! Simply pour non-toxic paint on the Twister mat on each of the circles. Every time someone has to place their hand or foot down, they will be putting it in paint and slipping all around, getting covered from head to toe in paint! What a fun, silly way to play Twister!

 

Sidewalk chalk- The sidewalk chalk possibilities are endless! Chalk can be used outdoors for many things. Turn the ground into a studio, and draw some chalk art that can be used as a backdrop in a fun photoshoot! Or use the chalk to play a game like hopscotch or 4-square. Children can be occupied for hours as they let their imagination flow with the chalk!

Scavenger hunt- Scavenger hunts can be fun and designed for anywhere! Children can do an outdoor scavenger hunt looking for things such as ladybugs, blue flowers, or a rock shaped like a heart. Or they can do a scavenger hunt in the grocery store, looking for something that costs $3.99, something with the word “nut” in the name, and a red vegetable. You can make a scavenger hunt for anywhere including around the house, walking around town, the backyard, the beach, etc. Kids will love exploring and finding these items!

 

Finding activities that make all children happy can be a challenge, but these activities can be altered and modified to meet the needs and abilities of all children! Whether you are a parent, a babysitter, an older sibling, a teacher, or a camp counselor, we hope you have a wonderful summer and enjoy it with the children you spend it with!

Graduate School Applications: How to Prepare

Applying to graduate school is a big step, and it requires careful time and attention. It can be stressful and confusing at times, but if you follow all of the steps and prepare for what is required, it will be a lot easier. Follow these steps to make the application process as stressless as possible:

  1. 1. Research schools based on location and disciplines. Once you find programs in the area you want, research each program to find out exactly what research is being done, what you will be doing, and what the application requirements are. You do not want to just apply to any program that has your discipline, because the school and program itself might not be a good fit for you. To find graduate programs that fit your needs, click here.
  2. Reach out to grad school faculty and ask questions. This will show them that you are serious about the program and that you take initiative. It will also facilitate a relationship with graduate school faculty, who are usually the ones to make admissions decisions.
  3. Prepare for the standardized test you will need to take (Graduate Record Exam-General Test, Graduate Record Exam- Subject Test, Miller Analogies Test, Graduate Management Admission Test) and register for the test. Each program requires (if any) different tests, so make sure you prepare for any and all that are needed.  
  4. Request letters of recommendation from undergrad professors, faculty, and internship/work supervisors. Professionals who can speak about your abilities, growth, passion, strengths, and about you as a professional overall are the best resources for recommendation letters. Do not include personal references unless specifically requested.
  5. Draft your essay/personal statement. Read it a few times, have others read it, and edit, edit, EDIT! Make sure it is perfect, because this is the first snapshot that grad school admissions will have of you.
  6. File your application by the admissions deadline. Make sure you know when any and all deadlines are.

Okay so now you know step by step what to do, but what about all of the in betweens? Here are a few tips to help you figure out how to do everything:

  • Breathe and relax. Getting overwhelmed can cause you to make careless mistakes. Take each step one day at a time if necessary.
  • Don’t wait until the last minute, because then you will be stressed and pressed for time, and you will be rushing to get it all done.
  • Make sure you follow all of the application directions. Failure to follow directions could cause faculty to question your ability to follow policies and procedures.
  • Make sure everything is spelled correctly and punctuated right. Poor spelling can have a negative impact on your application, no matter how high your GPA or tests scores are.
  • Be clear about your goals and desires, your strengths and areas for growth, and your professional experiences and abilities. This shows that you have personal insight, know where you stand as a professional, and that you are determined to reach your goals.
  • Communicate those goals/strengths/etc to those writing recommendation letters- these are important topics that they can touch upon and build up for you.
  • Have a backup plan, just in case you do not get accepted to your top choice program(s).

 

Applying for and going to graduate school can be stressful, but it pays off in the end and is definitely worth it! If you are considering furthering your education or for more information about the graduate school application process, visit the UMF Graduate School Resources site.

Peru Travel Course: Something for Everyone

The University of Maine at Farmington is proud to offer many various travel courses to students throughout the year. Travel courses are offered in January during winter break and in May/June once school is out. Each course is about two to three weeks and can be taken for 2 or 4 credits.

Recent travel courses have gone to the Virgin Islands, Cypress, Ireland, Japan and have studied topics such as business, anthropology, economy, and more! UMF travel courses are designed for all students, not just those in the field of study of the course! Brittany Jerome, an upcoming senior at UMF, is an early childhood special education major and just participated in the anthropology course to Peru. Ed360 caught up with Brittany after the trip to learn more about the experience she shared with peers.

When asked why she chose Peru, Brittany had one simple answer- why not?! “I love to travel, and Peru is such an interesting country filled with so much culture. I was taking an introduction course to anthropology with Nicole Kellett in the fall of 2016 and she told our class about the trip. I went to the first informational meeting and left knowing I had to go. Two and a half weeks in another country, getting credits for it, and learning from two professors who have spent a significant part of their lives in Peru and who have an enormous amount of love for the country and the people- how could I say no? I would never get an opportunity like this again, so I had to take advantage of it.”

Dr. Nicole Kellett and Dr. Lucas Kellett are both anthropology professors at UMF. They both lived in Peru during their graduate studies and have been back to visit many times on their own, with their children, and multiple times as leaders of the UMF travel course. The knowledge they both share about the culture, environment, economy, and the history of Peru makes them perfect leaders for such a trip.

The Peru 2017 travel course accommodated both of the Kelletts and fifteen students. Those students come from various majors and fields of study, such as anthropology, education, international global studies, psychology, community health, and more! “Anyone is able to make a connection to such a course and use the experience to grow both personally and professionally,” said Brittany.

The students that traveled to Peru were busy, that is for sure! Over a course of eighteen days they stayed in six locations, hiked two mountains, visited many archeological sights, and learned more than they ever would in a classroom. Brittany gave the following summary of their time abroad:

“We arrived in Lima, the capital of Peru, late on a Tuesday night. Over the next few days we ventured out into Lima. We got to visit an archeological sights, including Pachacamac [pictured right], which was on of my favorites! We also got to visit a cathedral and a few museums. A couple of days later we departed from Lima and flew into the Andes into a community called Andahuaylas.

In Andahuaylas, we stayed in this cute camp-like place called Munay Wasi. We spent our first full day visiting the archeological sight of Sondor and hiking Achanchi, a peak that was part of the Andes Mountain Range! We had lunch on a lake and got to meet some of the Kelletts’ family friends. The next day we went to Sacclaya, a beautiful community that is tucked away in the mountains. Luke and Nicole lived in Sacclaya for a year at one point, so they knew some of the locals. We got to tour the schools, play with the children, eat a traditional Peruvian dish of cuy (fried guinea pig- don’t knock until you try it!) and play soccer with some of the women in the community. It was such a fun day! The next day, Sunday, we got to walk around the regional market in Andahuaylas, which is the second largest market in Peru. People were selling food and fresh juice, jewelry, textiles, clothes, toys, and even some animals. It was really cool to see how the economy in such a rural community works on such an important and busy day to the locals.

The next day we took a long bus ride to Cuzco, where we got to explore some interesting archeological sights surrounding the city. We also took a tour of the Sacred Valley, including sights such as the the Pisac market and ruins and Ollantaytambo. We then took the train to Aguas Calientes, where we spent the night before visiting Machu Picchu. Machu Picchu was incredible. You see pictures of it online and in books, but nothing is as breathtaking as seeing it in person. We walked around the sight and then hiked Hyuana Picchu, the big peak that sits right behind Machu Picchu. On our way back to Cuzco we were able to visit some salt mines and Inca terraces. The next day, we traveled to the Amazon Rainforest.

The rainforest was amazing. We first got to visit a community and a school, where the children put on a dance performance for us and played various games with all of us. Then, we rode a motor boat up an Amazon tributary called the Mother of God, where we were able to jump off of a rock into the tributary and ride the current down to the beach. We then ventured into the heart of the jungle where we spent two nights. The guides that we had were so kind and knowledgable- they could just look at a plant or a butterfly or a bird and know the exact species and how they live and survive. One guide took some of us on a night walk where we crept through the dark in search of anything interesting (we mostly just saw a ton of spiders). They also taught us about the resources in the jungle, such as medicinal plants and various foods. One of our guides even used his personal experience to tell us how to survive if we are to ever get lost in the jungle. I was amazed by the rainforest.

We had one final day in Cuzco before departing, where some of us shopped, some went to a few museums, and others just enjoyed exploring the city to it’s fullest. While in Peru we spent time in rural highlands, the lush rainforest, and bustling cities. There was something for everyone to enjoy.”

Sounds like there was a lot to do, and everyone, despite their field of study, was able to make a connection somehow. “While the course was titled ‘Andean Exploration: Past and Present’ and we focused mostly on the Incas and the development of Peru over the years,” said Brittany, “when you spend as much time in another country as we did you learn and take in so much more information that what is academically provided. As an education major, it is important to be culturally competent and understand that other cultures may do things that you do not understand, but you need to respect them. Really, being culturally competent is important in any field where you will be working with people. I think anyone can really make a professional connection when traveling and use their experiences to build on their professional development.”

When asked about her favorite part of the trip, Brittany warmly said, “Out of all of the amazing things we saw and did, my favorite aspect of the trip is the family we became by the end of it. Most of us did not even know half of the people on the trip when we started, but even by the third day we had all made connections, learned from and supported each other, and made some awesome friendships. Other than that, I really enjoyed visiting Sacclaya and playing with the children there. Even though there were some language barriers, I was able to interact with the children and have fun!”

Museums, archeological sights, hiking, cities, this trip offers something for everyone! You do not need to be a world traveler, a trained mountain hiker, or an anthropology student to enjoy a trip like this, you just need to be open minded and have the desire to learn and explore! “If you have the opportunity to go on a travel course, do it!” said Brittany. “You will not regret it. You’ll be learning from experts and sharing this experience with other UMF students who have similar interests. I wish I had known about these courses sooner, I would do one every year if possible!” For more information about the travel courses offered here at UMF and other UMaine System schools, visit the Travel Course and International Exchange Programs page.